How to Find Love in lockdown: Leading love expert says it’s possible to find love in lockdown

As an epidemic of loneliness sweeps the nation, with singles despairing of finding love in these strange times, Kathryn Alice, love guru and author of the evergreen bestseller Love Will Find You soon to be released on audiobook, knows that with her help you can find love in lockdown.

Kathryn’s books and workshops and coaching sessions have helped literally thousands of people, including the most jaded and disillusioned, change their mindset and find love, and she has a wall of wedding photos of couples prove it.

Despite many people wrongly thinking that it’s impossible to meet anyone, especially as restrictions tighten again, Kathryn who works with clients from all over the world, and has run two courses since March including “Q Joy – Finding the Joy in Quarantine” and “Find Love During a Pandemic”, says there is hope for lonely singles trying to form a genuine love connection in lockdown however impossible it may seem.

“Love will always find a way. I’ve had dozens of clients and students find love since mid-March – yes, right smack in the midst of a pandemic.”

Even before the pandemic, there was an increase in people saying that they were lonelier that ever before and she even feels that the pandemic can help along singles’ love lives in a couple of ways and says that online dating is not the only way people can meet.

“I have one client who met someone in the supermarket – masked and distanced – and they have now progressed to getting tested and forming a quarantine bubble limited to her place or his. They are in love and relishing the extra time they get to enjoy each other since so many activities are cancelled.”

Kathryn’s best-selling Love Will Find You book, a step by step guide to finding love is coming out as an audiobook (15.10.20). In it, she helps students form a plan to find love that includes some sort of online connection (i.e. online dating, online speed-dating, online meetups) as well as in-person meetings (trips to the park, even masked up in the supermarket or on the bus).

The protocol Alice is using involves crafting a plan to meet someone (safely), learning connecting skills and getting rid of old baggage, attachments and beliefs that may have kept love at bay.

It seems that the pandemic has have put an end to the short-term gratification of the “hook-up” and heightened the need to create genuine connections, pushing people to be more serious about looking for a relationship. Lockdown has seen singles spending more time chatting online and getting to know each other. Video dating is on the up and for lonely people the chance to get to know someone online takes a lot of pressure off meeting someone and making a snap decision that you do or don’t find each other attractive before you’ve gotten a chance to get to know someone.

“Spending time messaging, video dating and chatting on the phone means that you get to know someone slowly. If you do feel like you’ve bonded and want to meet in a “bubble” then just the fact that you’ll probably both have a test before you meet means that you are taking this potential relationship seriously and have made some sort of commitment before you become physical with each other”, says Kathryn.

“For one thing, more people than ever are ready to find a partner after being cooped up alone for months. And secondly, social distancing forces dating to slow down. There has to be a heightened period of bonding electronically and then at a distance before you commit to taking it physical.”

Alice notes that several of her clients have now formed a bubble or are even quarantining together with their new love.

“Yes, you have to be careful and deliberate about this. Craft the courtship period differently, distance dating that leads to eventually testing, quarantining and getting closer physically. But it can be done.”

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